Friday, June 26, 2015

Aripine, AZ


In the process of trying to find (unsuccessfully in this case) a geocache (GC30ZBN), we ran across the remnants of the town of Aripine, Arizona. I'd never heard of it. Based on web research, it looks like most other people haven't either. There were a few old log cabins with newer sheet metal roofs.

Aripine shows up in a couple "ghost town" websites with minimal information, but it does have its own zip code. Google Maps suggests that the stone house served as the post office at one time but I'm betting it was the stone building to the left of the house.

There were a few newer homes in the town, with a chain across the driveway. We didn't see any sign of anyone residing in the town the day we were there.

I especially liked the gate structure at the stone house near the intersection. The rock work included lots of pieces of petrified woods. It's a long ways by road but not so far as the crow flies to Petrified Forest National Park. It leaves one to wonder the source of this petrified wood.

The best part of the open gate was the nearly unreadable No Trespassing sign! (As always, click on the photo for a larger version.)

There's obviously been a livestock operation at one time. A concrete silo was still standing, but this loading chute had seen its better days.

Apparently, Aripine was best known for the Sundown Girls Ranch. It was quite popular 50-60 years ago with girls (and a separate ranch for boys) from eastern cities. The girls ranch still shows on the map, but it's not clear if it's in operation.

Usually, the story of a ghost town can be determined in part just by looking around. This one is more perplexing since there are essentially three different era of structures - log, stone, and frame construction - yet no one is home.

3 comments:

  1. We ran across this old ranch today while out looking for Elk. I was very taken by the old rock house and the log structures that appeared to be bunk houses. Very cool.

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  2. This isn't a ghost town, but many of these ranches are only occupied seasonally. Some of the buildings you pictured are owned by relatives of mine.

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    1. Thanks for the feedback! I loved the character of many of the buildings.

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